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100% of your cookie purchase funds childhood cancer research
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Elephants almost never get cancer, because they have 40 copies of a gene that prevents tumors. Humans only have two.
Joshua Schiffman, M.D., of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah is leading groundbreaking research into elephant DNA that could unlock the cure for childhood cancer, and Kneaders Bakery & Café is working to help fund it with a month-long campaign taking place during the month of September, which is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month.
 
The campaign focuses on the sales of elephant-shaped sugar cookies, which will be available at all 52 Kneaders locations. 100% of the sales will be donated to Dr. Schiffman and his research. Customers will also be invited to make donations by rounding-up their total purchase to the nearest dollar amount or adding a specified dollar amount to their purchase. Donations can also be made on this site.
 
This funding is important, because the National Cancer Institute spends 96% of its research on adult cancers. There is a serious need to find funding for childhood cancer.
 
Every day, however, 43 children in America are diagnosed with cancer. Here at Kneaders, our family has lived through one of these diagnoses, and as childhood cancer survivors, we’re dedicated to helping find a cure.
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Thank you for your Elephant Cookie purchase or Online Donation.
 
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About Dr. Schiffman & Elephant Cancer Research
Dr. Joshua Schiffman received his medical degree from Brown University School of Medicine and completed his Pediatric Residency, Pediatric Chief Residency, and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Fellowship at Stanford University. He has been an investigator at the Huntsman Cancer Institute since 2008 and a faculty member at the University of Utah since 2009. 
 
According to Dr. Schiffman, elephants have long been considered a walking conundrum. Because they have 100 times as many cells as people, they should be 100 times more likely to get cancer. However, fewer than 5 percent of elephants die from cancer, compared to 11 to 25 percent of people.
 
Results published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) show that elephants have 38 additional modified copies (alleles) of a gene that encodes p53, a well-defined tumor suppressor, compared to humans, who have only two. In addition, elephants may have a better ability to kill damaged cells that are at risk for becoming cancerous—double that of healthy human cells.
 
“Nature has already figured out how to prevent cancer. It’s up to us to learn how different animals tackle the problem, so we can adapt those strategies to prevent cancer in people,” says Schiffman.
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Thank you for your Elephant Cookie purchase or Online Donation.